Emergency Care For You

Emergency Physicians on Capitol Hill

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Protecting Emergency Patients from Surprise Bills

Emergency Physicians are encouraging Congress to take steps to protect patients and their families from surprise medical bills. They want to take patients OutOfTheMiddle of billing disputes between their physicians and their insurance companies.  

In a medical emergency getting treatment as soon as possible is the number one priority – not verifying  which providers are in-network, figuring out how much your deductible is, or worrying how much treatment will cost.

Fortunately, there are solutions that can protect emergency patients and their families when their insurance coverage fails them.

  • Protect Patients
  • Level the Playing Field
  • Improve Transparency

Read more about what ACEP is doing to prevent you from receiving surprise bills.  

Improving Mental Health Access from the Emergency Department

Nearly one in five American adults struggle with some form of mental illness, and emergency department visits for children who attempt suicide or had thoughts of suicide have almost doubled. The current health care system
is failing too many of these patients, often leaving no other option for appropriate care. As a result, patients can remain in the emergency department for hours, sometimes days, as emergency physicians locate and secure follow-up community care. More must be done to make sure patients with mental illness can get the care they need and deserve.

ACEP is encouraging Congress to pass “Improving Mental Health Access from the Emergency Department Act” which will:

  • Expedite transition to post-emergency care.
  • Increase the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and alternative care settings.
  • Expand approaches to providing psychiatric care in the emergency department.

Read more about ACEP is doing to improve access to emergency mental health services for patients.  

The Hill:  Opinion: Mental health treatments work, but we have to fund individual communities.
(Dr. Vidor Friedman, May 3, 2019)