Emergency Care For You

Chest Pain Is ALWAYS A Reason To Go To The ER

The recent and sudden deaths of several well-known celebrities from heart-related issues should focus everyone’s attention on the dangers of heart disease and knowing the symptoms of a serious problem.

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Can Your Fitness Tracker Save Your Life in the ER?

Emergency physicians used a patient's personal activity tracker and smartphone to identify the time his heart arrhythmia started, which allowed them to treat his new-onset atrial fibrillation with electrical cardioversion and discharge him home.

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Burns

About 4,000 people die each year in the United States from fire and burn injuries. Burns are one of the leading causes of childhood injury. They can be caused by scalding from hot liquids or cooking oils, contact with flames, or from overexposure to the sun.

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Broken Bones

Broken bones (also called fractures) are a common injury for adults and children. They may be caused by falls, motor vehicle crashes, direct blows and even intentional injuries, such as violence and child abuse.

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Admission to the Hospital

If you are very sick or injured, or if extensive tests or surgery are needed, you may be admitted to the hospital. If you think you may be admitted you should be prepare for your visit by bringing a change of clothes plus whatever personal items you might be need—eyeglasses, for example.

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Medical Tests

Your physician will obtain a thorough history and perform a physical exam in order to treat you. He or she may need (though not always) to order tests, which could include blood tests and imaging studies (X­ray, ultrasound, CT scan or others) to help make a diagnosis.

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Meet the Team

There are more than a dozen staff members in an emergency department, each with specialized training to address the any emergency. Here are four key players.

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Why Am I Waiting So Long?

Emergency physicians are committed to providing high quality emergency care as quickly as possible to all patients, but if you’ve been to a hospital emergency department lately, you most likely know that many of America's ERs are overcrowded.

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Checking into the ER

When you walk into the waiting room, the first thing you will do is check in at the front desk. You will be asked to provide basic information, such as your name, address, date of birth and reason for the visit.

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Use "ICE" in Your Cell Phone

Emergency physicians are recommending that people with cellular phones add "ICE'" entries into their cell phone address books.

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